Posts in Youth Development
Humans of Nablus 31

In my English classes, I am using the language to talk about my family and my community, and also to learn about important musicians from the United States and Europe. As a singer and guitar player, it is great to be able to understand what they are saying. I’m sure that my time at TYO improving my English and meeting new people will be important for me in order to achieve my goal.

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Learning by Choice: The Success Story of Obaida Bani Odeh

Obaida is from Tammoun, a village between Jenin and Nablus. She is a recent graduate from Al Quds Open University in Tubas where she studied finance and banking administration. She has been a volunteer with the After-School Academic Support program and a student in the STEP! II EFL program since October 2016. Obaida is enjoying the experience greatly and is sad she did not learn about the organization before fall 2016.

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Building Confidence that Fosters Growth; “Letting the Years Pass”

The After-school Academic Support for Kids program provides students between the ages of 9-14 with classroom instruction in English, Arabic, math, and homework assistance. TYO’s multidisciplinary approach to education allows students to learn through play in contrast to the traditional methods of teaching widely practiced in the local school system.

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A Family Affair: Evaluating the Holistic Approach to Education

TYO’s Academic Support Services Program has just begun and is already promising to be a rewarding session. This program provides students between the ages of 9-14 with educational lessons in English, math, and Arabic, as well as homework support. We have many return students and are welcoming new faces to program this fall. Take a look at how TYO’s holistic approach to education can impact entire families and improve relationships in this week’s interview with Wafa, who has two daughters enrolled at TYO, Reem and Aya.

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A Space to Learn, Play, and Grow: A One on One with Raneen

TYO is gearing up to start the Fall Session of the Academic Support Program for students between ages 9-14. What started out as a pilot project for the residents of the Khallet El Amoud neighborhood, the Academic Support Program has been scaled up with incredible success to welcome children from the wider Nablus community, including all four of the refugee camps in the city.

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Humans of Nablus 28

I have realized that education is the greatest method for achieving understanding. I hope to become a physician in the future because I believe that through medicine I will be able to connect to the world. By speaking English fluently, I will connect with a greater pool of scientists and maybe they will be able to come to Palestine, meet Palestinian physicians, and create and teach projects.

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When an Opportunity Presents Itself: The Success Story of Haneen Zitawi

Haneen Zitawi is from Jamma’in, a village outside of Nablus. She attended Al-Quds Open University and graduated in 2014 with a degree in English Teaching Methods. She learned of Tomorrow’s Youth Organization when she saw an ad on Facebook published by Al Quds Open University advertising volunteer opportunities working with children. Haneen plans to be a teacher in the future and wanted to know how to deal with students and children and learn how to solve problems in the classroom.

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Creating Culture Vultures

The Step II EFL instructors at TYO use many methods to inspire and encourage their students’ English Language Learning. Language learning should be enjoyable, as well as academic. Therefore, the English Fellows at TYO incorporate various mediums in our classrooms, including music and movies. These alternative teaching tools enable our students to hear different native English speakers with varying accents and cadences, familiarize themselves with informal phrases and tones, and discuss various cultures. It also breaks up our day and brings more laughter into our classrooms

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Humans of Nablus 27

Tomorrow's Youth Organization is investing in the Palestinian leaders of the future, and I want to be part of that process. I want to make a lasting difference in the community by helping others. The real meaning of happiness is in helping those in need, and I am happy here at TYO because I was given the opportunity to collaborate with amazing youth to help children grow in a better environment.

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Getting Comfortable in the Classroom

My students love to laugh. Every day in class they will erupt into laughter multiple times over. Their laughter makes the classroom a comfortable and exciting space.

Students’ comfort in the classroom is one of the strongest tools to build as a teacher. The ability to push their levels of communication and creativity intensifies when they are at ease with the rest of the class, when they feel free to laugh and make jokes.

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Humans of Nablus 26

I came back for a second class because I benefited so much from the first one. I am more experienced in the language now and the methods used at TYO are different than other places. At school we just read from the book, a very traditional way of teaching.  At TYO, teaching is given in a fun way through activities. We learn vocabulary while playing- learning and playing at the same time. 

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Striking a Balance

Across the education field, a major shift in focus is taking place: while the teacher was once viewed as the sole purveyor of all knowledge, with learners sitting passively as empty vessels, we now consider students’ active participation in classroom activities to be of central importance to the learning process. As such, teachers are now increasingly viewed as facilitators of educational experiences, by which which students inquire, experiment, and, ultimately, discover new ideas for themselves.

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Humans of Nablus 25

When I graduated from university, I wanted to work in Dubai with my brother. I went, but I wasn’t able to stay because I didn’t have good English speaking skills. So now, I work with my father in his restaurant during the week and with an electricity company on the weekends. I am studying English at TYO because I want to try to go abroad again. I love my city and my country, but I need my brother’s help.

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From the "English Only Zone" to the World

“Salut! Vous êtes là pour le cours?” asked me my language teacher in my first French course at the university ten years ago. I must admit, I froze up and looked at her with shy and timorous eyes, while searching deep in my mind and childhood memories for an appropriate answer. I was lost in one of those rare moments when you don't know what to respond or even how to react. Just like me at that time, the incursion into the world of bilingualism for plenty of new language learners may not be a very pleasant experience.

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Slowly, Slowly

It’s another day of English class for the STEP! II students at Tomorrow’s Youth Organization. Four weeks into classes, the atmosphere now is different from that of the first day: less jittery and excited to be sure, but much more comfortable, and therefore even more productive. The past month has been a whirlwind of learning: for four hours, every Monday through Thursday, students of all levels have been engaging with English.

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Humans of Nablus 23

I love working with the kids at TYO because they have so much respect for the rules. I want to put these rules in every school in Palestine. For example, the kids only eat healthy foods, and they always clean their hands before and after eating. We have an expression in Arabic that says that teaching little kids is like carving into a stone, because once they learn the rules, they never forget them.

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The Positive Power of Yes: The Success Story of Waed Bsharat

Waed Bsharat is from a village called Tammun. She recently graduated with a degree in business administration from Al Quds Open University in Tubas. She heard about Tomorrow’s Youth Organization from a friend, who said that TYO was a fun and interesting place to volunteer. Waed always volunteered at the university because it was required, but had never volunteered because she wanted to do something for herself.

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